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Theodore Roosevelt's Public Land Legacy

Aug 25, 2017

This summer the TR Center has eight interns working across the U.S. and from Scotland. Each intern is producing a digital humanities project. Kelly Hyland explores the national parks, forests, and monuments created by TR.

This project stemmed from my own enjoyment of the United States' national parks and interest in Theodore Roosevelt, but it is also something of a gift to a friend. I always thought I loved the national parks, but she loves the national parks. Each summer she and her husband take a road trip and camp in at least one national park. She even named their dog Theo, after Theodore Roosevelt, her personal hero. 

The lore of Theodore Roosevelt as the bronco-busting conservationist and father of the National Park Service is common. While Roosevelt himself did not create the National Park Service, nor did he create as many national parks as people believe, the 1906 passage of the Antiquities Act during his second term in office allowed Roosevelt to set aside large amounts of public land for future generations of Americans to enjoy. I wanted to explore the national parks and monuments that Roosevelt did establish. I created a timeline and something of a road-trip guide mapping 25 national parks and monuments that Roosevelt created between 1902 and 1909. 

I was drawn to the platform MyHistro for this project. MyHistro allows users to create timelines and maps, to map road trips, historical events, battles, and much more both in time and in space. I was excited to be able to visualize not online the parts of the country where Roosevelt established public lands, but also to see when he established them. The combination of the timeline and the map shows just how many sites and forests Roosevelt protected. It also, if you are like my friend, might provide the start of an interesting road trip plan.

Please click here to see the project.

*Kelly's project did experience technical issues. This is part of the DH journey.

Posted by Kelly Hyland on Aug 25, 2017 in Digital Library  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

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