Latest Articles Index

Browse our latest articles regarding the people, places and events of Theodore Roosevelt's era and beyond. These articles have been written or reviewed by historians to ensure their accuracy.

Roosevelt, Eleanor

Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) was Theodore Roosevelt’s niece. Her father was Theodore Roosevelt’s younger brother Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt.

The Treaty of Portsmouth

The Treaty of Portsmouth, signed on September 5, 1905, officially concluded the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905. President Theodore Roosevelt won the Nobel Peace Prize for the role he played in the negotiations that ended the conflict. 

 

American Historical Association

Theodore Roosevelt served as president of the American Historical Association (AHA) in 1912. The organization was founded in 1884 at a time when the discipline of history was still very new.

Wister, Owen

Owen Wister (July 14, 1860-July 21, 1938) was a lifelong friend of Theodore Roosevelt’s and a novelist best known for his writings about the American West.

Peabody, Endicott

Endicott “Cotty” Peabody (1857-1944) was a life-long friend of Theodore Roosevelt’s. The two met while they were in college, and Peabody—with Roosevelt’s backing—would go on to found Groton School in 1884 and serve, for 56 years, as its first headmaster.

Bell, John Graham

John Graham Bell (1812-1889) was the taxidermist from Tappan, New York, who taught young Theodore Roosevelt how to preserve animals for collection and display and who may have first mentioned to him the bison roaming the Dakota prairies.

Boy Scouting

Boy Scouting was founded in England by British war hero Robert Baden-Powell in 1908, the same year that Theodore Roosevelt left the presidency.

The Perdicaris Incident

The Perdicaris Incident remains well-known for the wording of Hay’s telegram. It is also a clear example of Roosevelt’s “big stick” diplomacy. In 1906, the French and the Germans would seek Roosevelt’s assistance to bring about the Algeciras Conference, where the fate of Morocco would be decided.

 

Football

Collegiate football was less than a decade old in the United States when Theodore Roosevelt saw his very first game as a Harvard College undergraduate in 1876. This young sport soon came to be known for several troubling aspects, including excessive violence during play, fatalities on the field, the use of non-student athletes, recruiting scandals, and corrupt referees.

Samuel Réne Gummeré

Samuel Réne Gummeré (1849-1920) served as the American consul general in Morocco from 1898 until 1905 when he was appointed the first United States minister to Morocco by President Theodore Roosevelt.

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